SCREE: \ˈskrē\

The accu­mu­la­tion of loose stones one has to walk through on the way to the top of the mountain.

Join with us as we fol­low artists, film­mak­ers, entre­pre­neurs, design­ers, writ­ers, poets, come­di­ans, builders, and sci­en­tists through their tri­umphs, fail­ures and freak-outs on their uphill scram­ble to the top.

Get your scramble on!

If you would like to have your work fea­tured in the next issue of Scree, send us a 200 word pitch.

editors@screemagazine.com

Blog Archives

Roll Call! Brad Listi

Brad Listi is like an evil, cre­ative genius with­out the crazy hair. He may also not be par­tic­u­larly evil…or even ill-tempered. What is true is that through a potent com­bi­na­tion of tal­ent and force of will, Brad has brought forth into being a Los Ange­les Times best­selling novel called Atten­tion. Deficit. Dis­or­der., as well as the well-known online cul­ture mag­a­zine and lit­er­ary com­mu­nity, The Ner­vous Break­down. More recently, he has spun off TNB Books, an inde­pen­dent press spe­cial­iz­ing in lit­er­ary fic­tion and non­fic­tion, pub­lish­ing works by well-loved authors D.R. Haney and Lenore Zion, among oth­ers.  He is also the razor sharp host of Other Peo­ple, a twice-weekly pod­cast fea­tur­ing in-depth, inap­pro­pri­ate inter­views with today’s lead­ing authors. You can read about his strug­gle in Issue 2 and…the “cre­ative genius” part still stands.

Brad Listi’s Web Site
The Ner­vous Break­down
Other Peo­ple
TNB Books
Face­book
Twitter

Roll Call! Jennifer Jesse Smith

Artist Jen­nifer Jesse Smith uses jew­elry as her medium to com­bine myth with soul. From a young age, she adopted the life of an artist and has since fol­lowed her path, nav­i­gat­ing through the beauty of both the tri­umphs and the strug­gles. Cur­rently, she is work­ing on pre pro­duc­tion for Cos­tume Designer Penny Rose and The Lone Ranger film project, star­ring Johhny Depp. Her pieces have been worn by Colin Fer­rell, Mickey Rourke, Holly Hunter, Mar­garet Cho and Billy Bob Thor­ton, to name a few. She has a BFA in sculp­ture from The School Of The Art Insti­tute Of Chicago. Fas­ci­nated by how peo­ple draw strength and mean­ing from the way they wear their art, Jen­nifer Jesse Smith cre­ates pow­er­ful pieces for peo­ple with pas­sion. Read about her quest in Issue 2.

Jen­nifer Jesse Smith’s Web Site

 

 

Roll Call! Bridget Johnson


Any­one who knows Brid­get John­son — AKA “the Green Girl” — will attest to her super­hero sta­tus. She is an award win­ning busi­ness­woman with a heart for sus­tain­abil­ity and recy­cling. She is an artist. She is a phil­an­thropist. She is pas­sion­ately loyal to her fam­ily and friends. She cooks gourmet meals, lays tile, hangs dry­wall, and xeriscapes her back­yard all with a child strapped to her back and before lunch. I don’t think she has slept in about 4 years. I have photo evi­dence that she can fly. She not only can drive a trash truck, but she is in love with one named Betsy. Read about her love affair in Issue 2.

Green Girl Recy­cling Web Site
Twit­ter 

Roll Call! Uche Ogbuji

If you could trace each tra­jec­tory lead­ing from the cre­ative soul of Nigerian-American entre­pre­neur, soft­ware engi­neer and poet, Uche Ogbuji, and illu­mi­nate them in light, you would have a super­nova of genius on your hands. Not only has he already made a name for him­self in the soft­ware world as an early (and well-published) adopter of XML, but he is now tak­ing on the poetry world by storm. And as if that isn’t enough, he is also found­ing engi­neer at Zepheira. In his spare time, he coaches and plays soc­cer, snow­boards and hones feats of mar­tial artistry through the medium of Amer­i­can kenpo. Niger­ian born, he now orbits near Boul­der, CO with his amaz­ing wife and four chil­dren. Uche Ogubji is poetry edi­tor at The Ner­vous Break­down. His poems are a wild hip-hop ride through Igbo cul­ture and West­ern clas­si­cism. Read about Uche’s lit­er­ary jump start at “The Anthill” in Nsukka, Nige­ria and more in Issue 2.


Uche Ogbuji’s Web Site
Face­book
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Roll Call! Megan DiLullo

Photo: Anthony Camera

Megan DiLullo is the new, offi­cial res­i­dent Non­strologer here at SCREE. Hav­ing stud­ied exten­sively under the tute­lage of one of her per­son­al­i­ties, she not only has the pedi­gree for this most sacro­sanct voca­tion, she is just enough off her meds to actu­ally feel your pain and mine. And while she cred­its much of her train­ing to her intern­ship at the neigh­bor­hood tooth­less bar, I’m inclined to think she was born this way…which makes her nonstrolo-sense that much more endear­ing. Megan is also an edi­tor for the Arts and Cul­ture sec­tion at The Ner­vous Break­down and is co-producer of both The Ner­vous Breakdown’s Lit­er­ary Expe­ri­ence pod­cast and the TNB Spot­light pod­cast and does nar­ra­tion for both. In Issue 2, Megan DiLullo comes armed with her plat­inum wit and a shiny set of crys­tal balls.

Megan DiLullo on The Ner­vous Break­down

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roll Call! Nick Belardes

Nick Belardes is an author, an illus­tra­tor, a teacher, a poet, a screen­writer, an actor, a journalist…and so much more. Not only is he the illus­tra­tor of Jonathan Evison’s NYT Best­seller, “West of Here” (2011), he is also the author of “Ran­dom Obses­sions” (2009), a book filled with fas­ci­nat­ing trivia tid­bits earn­ing him the title–at least for me–the King of Quirk. He is also the author of “Lords” (2005) and the first lit­er­ary Twit­ter novel: “Small Places” (2010). He is also the Flight Com­man­der for the Com­ma­nautsWhen he is not teach­ing, writ­ing, or report­ing for var­i­ous news chan­nels, he can some­times be found dressed as a zom­bie or pos­si­bly sport­ing a full skele­ton suit, punk-rock latino style. In Issue 2 of Scree, Nick gives the insider scoop on what it’s like to start and grow an indie film com­pany (Hec­tic Films).
Com­ma­nauts
Face­book
Twit­ter

Roll Call! Shout out to Slade Ham

Photo Credit: Mike Toman

Stand-up come­dian Slade Ham has what appears to be quite pos­si­bly the coolest career of all time: he makes peo­ple laugh for a liv­ing. Scratch that. He makes peo­ple laugh for a liv­ing while drink­ing Irish whiskey sent to him for free by his fans. The result is high proof com­edy so toxic it would send its lis­ten­ers to rehab were it not so damned funny. And while it may look like he is lean­ing back and just tak­ing it easy with the dudes at The Whiskey Broth­ers, what Slade is actu­ally doing as pro­ducer is sheer genius. He is build­ing on a career that has taken him to per­form in 22 coun­tries on four con­ti­nents with cal­cu­lated persistence–persistence in the face of odds that would have made a lesser man sink per­ma­nently into his bender-stained couch cush­ions with nary a scant­ily clad soror­ity nurse-in-training to care for him. Slade Ham is a dragon slay­ing Jedi ninja who hap­pens to also have a grape slushee heart and a wickedly smart sense of humor. I also have it on good author­ity that he likes Prince. A lot.

Read about Slade’s climb here.

 

Roll Call! Let’s give it up for Kimberly M. Wetherell

When I first met Kim­berly M. Wetherell, she had just fin­ished her first short film  WHY WE WAX — a hilar­i­ous doc­u­men­tary about the his­tory of bikini wax­ing. The cover of this film sports a sexy close-up of a woman, naked except for an out­ra­geous aqua­ma­rine merkin where her tri­an­gle under dis­cus­sion should be. In this film, Kim­berly art­fully dis­cusses every­thing from met­ro­sex­ual shap­ing trends to Brazil­ians gone wrong, even going so far as to con­coct an ancient Egypt­ian hair wax removal recipe in her kitchen involv­ing eggshells and cat dung. My fas­ci­na­tion turned into absolute gid­di­ness when later on she sent me a batch of home­made, drunken marshmallows…presumably from the same kitchen. Were it legal in my state to do so, I would con­sider send­ing her a pro­posal of marriage.

Sev­eral inter­na­tional awards later, Kim­berly Wetherell is now in full-swing pro­duc­tion of her first full-feature film, LULLABYLULLABY is a poignant drama about a Hid­den Child of the Holocaust’s invented life and her family’s dis­cov­ery of the truth. It is filled with lush imagery, imag­i­na­tive drama, and haunt­ingly beau­ti­ful music. The film promises to be incred­i­ble, of course, but what we here at SCREE are obses­sively honed in on is Kimberly’s jour­ney to get there. Hav­ing grown her grass-roots move­ment from a packet of seeds, she has had to work hard to accom­plish her dream. She has had to write the screen­play, raise the money, schmooze the right peo­ple, find and direct the tal­ent, and pro­duce this bad boy. In short, she is the real deal. Read more about writer/director/producer, Kim­berly M. Wetherell in our first issue.

Inter­ested in more on LULLABY?

Lul­laby Home Page
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Lul­laby Blog 

Roll Call! Heyo Joe Daly

Every bril­liant mag­a­zine deserves a bril­liant music writer. Not only is he the Music Edi­tor for TheNervousBreakdown.com, but he has writ­ten for count­less other music rags and zines. A quick list of some of his recent inter­views include GNR’s Michael “Duff” McK­a­gan, AC/DC’s Mark Evans, Slipknot’s Corey Tay­lor and rock jour­nal­ist Mick Wall to name just a few. And if you still have any doubts about Joe Daly’s music bad-assery, just look at his hair in this pic­ture. Seri­ously. There is rock n’ roll genius in those locks. The fact that he is writ­ing for us here at SCREE is as hum­bling as it is empow­er­ing and I would just like to take a moment to revel in it.

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Now, go read his review of DOM–the band and the man–in our first issue of SCREE. It’s good.

Joe Daly’s Home Page
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Face­Book
Insta­gram: joed_sandiego

Roll Call! Here’s looking at you, Anthony Camera

Anthony Cam­era is the per­fect cameo of a man on a mis­sion. Armed with lit­tle more than a cam­era and a dream, Anthony con­tin­ues to angle his way through the unmarked streets of pro­fes­sional pho­tog­ra­phy. Along the way his work has made appear­ances in numer­ous gal­leries as well as in sev­eral publications–including Newsweek, Psy­chol­ogy Today, and West­word, to name a few. His par­tic­u­lar style of envi­ron­men­tal por­trai­ture smacks of the untamed urban with for­ays into the wan­tonly warped rural.  He has worked like the artist ver­sion of a 19th cen­tury coal miner with scurvy to get where he is today and he doesn’t appear to be slow­ing down any time soon. Not even for scurvy. We are pleased to show­case some of his work in this, our first issue of SCREE.

Anthony Camera’s Web Site

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